Week Six: Diffractive reading methods

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On the occasion of the sixth release of Radio Implicancies, we began to compile methods for diffractive reading. These method can be submitted via a form in order to be documented on this page.

First test for a diffractive reading

Compiling the wiki from the bot
Nature of the input
Methods
Process Log

  1. Do the assignment proposed by Femke
  2. While doing the assignment, make sure to track your method with the help of the following form
  3. This method will be used by others and applied on different resources

Who
Grr, Kamo, Kimberley

Overlaid Impressions

Create literal diffraction through the physicality of two printed texts
Nature of the input
Text
Process Log

  1. Pick two texts that are visually similar or visually interesting from your point of view.
  2. Prepare two one-page-pdf to print on transparent paper (provided); size A4.
  1. If you want to decide the precise position of the overlapping of the two texts, open them in Photoshop and create two layers; change opacity; move them as you want; you need to horizontally flip JUST ONE of the two texts; then export them as separate files.
  2. Send the two files to the printer.
  3. Put the flipped print on the top of the non-flipped one; you can stick them together, put them on a window to see through; colour parts that you find interesting; react to your overlapped text: what can you see?

Who
Supi & Emm

Diffractive Mashup

A method that uses the mashup() function to create random mashed up versions of two texts.
Nature of the input
Text
Process Log

  1. Pick two texts that talk about similar topics, that have words in common and could interact in a meaningful way. Choose small chunks of text to work on and with the same or a similar length of lines.
  2. Go to https://hub.xpub.nl/soupboat/theimpossibleprocess/themashupfunction and insert the texts in the boxes, paying attention to start a new paragraph per line [the function needs to recognise the text line by line and not the whole text all together]
  3. Click the "start mashup" function: at this point, the function will find the common words and use them as the fixed text for the new piece of text. Then, it will put the results together into a new piece, randomly choosing the differences in the two texts.
  4. The result will show a different piece of writing made out of the two texts mashed up. Reload the page to create a new version. You can find the results saved in the Archive automatically.

Who
Supi & Emm

Sonic Weaving Pt. 1: Clips

Diffractive listening and transcribing exercise with two video/audio clips.
Nature of the input
Audio/video
Process Log

  1. Pick two video or audio clips.
  2. Open a text editor and get ready to transcribe.
  3. Play both clips from the beginning at the same time.
  4. Pay close attention to what you hear and type out the words/phrases you pick up on.
  5. Continue this listening-typing session until one of the clip ends.
  6. Use this text as a starting point to create another output (for example: sound or image translations of the text, a score for a performance, etc.)

Who
Supi & Emm

Sonic Weaving Pt. 2: Texts

Diffractive listening and transcribing exercise with two texts.
Nature of the input
Text
Process Log

  1. In a group of 3, distribute the following roles: reader (2), listener+transcriber (1).
  2. Each reader picks one text to read out loud to the listener+transcriber.
  3. The listener+transcriber types out what they hear/the words or phrases that filter through
  4. Continue until one of the readers stop reading.
  5. Use this text as a starting point to create another output (for example: sound or image translations of the text, a score for a performance, etc.)

Who
Supi & Emm

Diffracted Narrations

This simple recipe for diffractive perception of information provided by two sources can be used on various types of pieces. However, one of the inputs should be a video and the other one - a written text. We create a new piece by muting the original narration of the video and adding a completely different one. This method allows us to experiment on conceptual level: what types of stories or thoughts we would like to play with? By experiencing the one source through the other, creative and unexpected readings can emerge.
Nature of the input
Video and written text
Process Log

  1. 1. Pick two pieces:

-one video (ideally without subtitles and texts on it) -a written text (article, poem, short story etc.)

  1. 2. Video: if the video has audio, mute it
  2. 3. Text:

-choose part of the written text that you would like to add as a new voice over of the video

  1. 4. Perform the new piece by playing the video and narrating it live yourself
  2. 5. Record the performance with video & audio

Who
Mitsa and Alex

Pairing up

Pairing up the main statements of two texts and read them in alteration to find similarities or differences
Nature of the input
"No Congo, No Technologies" by Oulimata Gueye and "The Mundane Afrofuturist Manifesto" by Martine Syms
Process Log

  1. Pick two texts with similar topics
  2. Read and annotate both texts and write down or highlight all main statements
  3. Find similarities/differences/contrasts in main statements and pair them up (always one statement of one text paired with a statement from the other text)
  4. Place the main statements next to each other (can be done in InDesign, Photoshop, etc. or you can also just write them down)
  5. Read them in alternation

Who
Miri

The Kut-up Method

The Kut-up method is an illustrative way to create new content for theoretical reflection and aesthetic contemplation with aun undefined grid. Inspired by William Burroughs & Brian Gysin Cut/up works in The Third Eye and Digital Workers publication found in Varia Zone.
Nature of the input
text, image or illustration
Process Log

  1. 1. Take two texts/images/illustrations that have or have not anything in common.
  2. 2. Create a hand-made lay-out, filling A4 (or more) sheets of paper with different kind of "box"-shapes.
  3. 3. Use a symbol, color or typeface to indicate the two different sources in your footnote at the bottom of the page and use it to differentiate your content without interfering with it.
  1. 4. Your just created your very own Kut-up text!
  1. 5. Read it out loud in a performative way with or without your partner (s)

Who
Gersande and Carmen

Echo-lighter

Highlight certain words, sentences or atmospheres by repeating them with one's voice or movement.
Nature of the input
spoken words/sentences or unspoken atmosphere (mood, gesture, tone, etc)
Process Log

  1. Listen carefully to what others are saying. Or observe the room.
  2. If certain words, sentences, or atmosphere trigger something in you (for whatever reasons) repeat them.
  3. Repeat as many as you want.
  4. If the words, sentences, or atmosphere that you are repeating lose their tensions and shimmers, go back to Process # 1.

Who
Chae

Sonic Weaving Pt. 1: Clips

Diffractive listening and transcribing exercise with two video/audio clips.
Nature of the input
Audio/video
Process Log

  1. Pick two video or audio clips that could weave well together (topic or rhythm-wise)
  2. Open a text editor and get ready to transcribe.
  3. Pick a starting point for both clips (ideally after the intro, if there's one).
  4. Pay close attention to what you hear and type out the words/phrases you pick up on.
  5. Continue this listening-typing session until one of the clip ends.
  6. Use this text as a starting point to create another output (for example: sound or image translations of the text, a score for a performance, etc.)

Who
Supi & Emm

Graft

Lend, borrow and transplant buds and blooms between two sources.
Nature of the input
Whatever, more interesting with source of different nature.
Process Log

  1. From one of the two inputs extract a gesture. It could be a sentence, a term, an image, a sound.
  2. Use the gesture as a lens to read the other input. Place it as a stumbling block and see how it interacts with the source. How it relates with the original voice.
  3. Does it transform the material's flow? Does it create some friction with your understanding of the source? Does it open some oblique ways of access?
  4. If you are not sure about the outcome return at the first step and repeat, but this time swap the inputs. Choose something from the second source and use it to tune into the first one.

Who
Susumu Y