Prototyping 2010-2011

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This is the current schedule for the Prototyping course.

Trimester 3


Assignment 3.1

<DynamicPageList> category=Prototyping category=Markov chants shownamespace = false </DynamicPageList>

Assignment 3.2

<DynamicPageList> category=Prototyping category=Turtle Graphics shownamespace = false </DynamicPageList>

Trimester 1

Prototype 1

Based on the Sedsongs and Clapping music exercises, create a prototype that translates some source of information into a sound. Your prototype should include:

  • A short title
  • A short description
  • An example of one or more inputs
  • An example of one or more outputs (as sound files)
  • The essential code

Sources of information: Based on our pipeline using tools like sed to search and replace text implies that information be in the form of text. This does not however mean that you must limit yourself to only texts -- consider for instance the metadata or comments of an online video, or think about other ways of transforming images or sounds into some sort of text (metadata, an ASCII Art library).

Some possible commandline programs with (potentially) interesting output to translate (use the man command to learn more about what each command does):

  • traceroute
  • ps x
  • top -b -n1

Some possible sources of text to transform:

Possibly useful transformations to do with sed:

Remember, the source of your text need not be literally live -- it's a good idea to use a simple text file on your computer to "stand-in" for what eventually might be a live source. For a prototype -- it's more important to show the "big picture" from start to finish rather than making sure that every part of the pipeline completely / actually works.

To be viewed in class October 19, 2010

Sample

If we consider the Clapping music exercise as a prototype, it might look something like:

Title Clapping Music

Description An exploration of a method of composing music by means of a shifting pattern. By separating the parts in stereo, allows each part to be listened to in isolation or together allowing the listener to experience differences in perception between individual patterns and the syncopation of the combination. Interesting discovery: when listening to the combination, the places where both parts are silent (the position of the shared rests) seems most significant.

Input

xxx_xx_x_xx_

Code & Output (see the Clapping music page)

Results

<DynamicPageList> category=Prototyping category=2011 P1.01 order = ascending shownamespace = false addfirstcategorydate = true </DynamicPageList>

Possible future sessions

Under construction.gif